12 May 2016 Hop Down to the Botanic Garden to Meet a Giant

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12 May 2016 Hop Down to the Botanic Garden to Meet a Giant

Gargantuan lily pads have become the newest attraction at the North Coast Regional Botanic Garden – thanks to the efforts of a dedicated volunteer.

Victoria amazonica water lilies have been grown by volunteers in the Botanic Garden for the last six years.

But this year’s plants are close to six feet (180cms) across.

The flowers are white the first night they are open and become pink on the second night. Each flower alone is up to 40cm in diameter.

The lilies are native to the Amazon Basin and are rarely seen at this size in our local climate, so it is well worth a visit to the Garden to see this spectacular display.

But you have to be quick – they die off in the cold weather so may only be around for the next few weeks.

Visitors can see them in the pond in the Queensland section of the Botanic Garden.